Music

The group explored a broad chord of Music this month from a wide variety of viewpoints.

Twelth Night was the source of the famous sonnet “If music be the food of love…” by William Shakespeare before going all Biblical with The Dirge of King David. We were then transported to French Chamber Music with a selection of French poems translated by A.Poulin. A quick tour of Bowood House, well known to Charles and Camilla ensued before testing out Music by Abraham Cowley.

A Heaven Soaring Lark scaled the heights by Mary Eleanor Roberts and then transposed to a Vision of Launfal courtesy of James Russell interspersed by a Description of Spring (Henry Howarth). The serious stuff was then concluded by Anthem for Doomed Youth by Wilfred Owen.

I decided to take an alternative groove by reading some song lyrics from such esteemed wordsmiths as Godley and Crème, Be-Bop Deluxe and Pink Floyd taken from my old vinyl collection.

My Body the Car comes to a tragic end before losing my Pental in Art School Canteen, exploring Life in the Air Age and realising that Money is the root of all evil today.

Robert Reynolds

Animals

Animals was the theme for this month’s Poetry workout and even though there was only three members there was still a strong turnout from the Animal Kingdom with several species represented.

Cats were very popular especially Millie, the Happy Cat from Marilyn Jacob and Joanna Hatfull’s Camouflage Cat as lesser-known poets were readily indulged. Margery Williams told us about A Velveteen Rabbit whose life experiences hopped and skipped and Alwyn Gornall gave us a testament of love that Wild Horses could not break.

Bob Crabbe (not one of the animals involved) allowed Gelett Burgess to pronounce acclaim for The Purple Cow eventhough he was later dismissive of his little ditty. Spike Milligan cheered everyone with accounts of pigs, cats and even the humble woodworm. However, if you want to safeguard a true siren of the seas I recommend you read Whalesong by Denis Martindale on the WWF website and adopt a whale; they need to be kept safe in our little pond.

Apologies to Hilaire Belloc and D.H.Lawrence for missing out their contributions to animal poetry from this blog I’m sure they would not mind as I have not mentioned the two poems I wrote on the subject as a mark of respect. For anyone who wishes to join our happy throng next month please join us on Wed. Sept. 18th at 10.30 am at the usual venue when the theme will be Journeys.

Robert Reynolds

The Poetry Group delivered bouquet of flowers in both classical and modernist styles

The Poetry Group delivered bouquet of flowers in both classical and modernist styles. We found that there was an abundance of flowery poetry in the days of the Grand Tour when gardening was both an art form and a science

Inevitably Daffodils reared their golden trumpets to the sky but could not overpower other delights portrayed bt The Woodspurge (No, I hadn’t, heard of it either-ed) The Scent of Buddleia, Sunflowers and A Tuft of Flowers amongst many other examples.

Many thanks to our members for bringing the following poets to the table to portray Life, The Universe and the short but explicit life cycle of the humble flower: Robert Herrick; AE Houseman; Lauren Spigot; William Wordsworth; William Shakespeare; Robert Frost; John Fuller; Lynne Munn and many thanks to John Hurt for reading Home Thoughts from abroad by Robert Browning via the magic of the internet and to Herbie Herb for suppressing our FEAR OF BOREDOM via Twitter.

Next month’s theme is Music and Song so why don’t you come along and join us on: Wed July 17th.

Robert Reynolds

1.07.2013

Poetry Group

The Poetry Group delivered bouquet of flowers in both classical and modernist styles. We found that there was an abundance of flowery poetry in the days of the Grand Tour when gardening was both an art form and a science

Inevitably Daffodils reared their golden trumpets to the sky but could not overpower other delights portrayed bt The Woodspurge (No, I hadn’t, heard of it either-ed) The Scent of Buddleia, Sunflowers and A Tuft of Flowers amongst many other examples.

Many thanks to our members for bringing the following poets to the table to portray Life, The Universe and the short but explicit life cycle of the humble flower: Robert Herrick; AE Houseman; Lauren Spigot; William Wordsworth; William Shakespeare; Robert Frost; John Fuller; Lynne Munn and many thanks to John Hurt for reading Home Thoughts from abroad by Robert Browning via the magic of the internet and to Herbie Herb for suppressing our FEAR OF BOREDOM via Twitter.

Next month’s theme is Music and Song so why don’t you come along and join us on: Wed July 17th.

Robert Reynolds

1.07.2013

Poetry Update

Summer Fun was the theme for this month’s Poetry workout and the weather did not disappoint – pouring rain yet again.

 

However, it did not take long to change the atmosphere by taking and tracking a steam train to Adlestrop for an unexpected stop in midsummer by Edward Thomas. I also recounted many of the trials and tribulations of hiking in the Peak District with my own poem Kinder Surprise as well as pondering on where to go with another self-penned effort The Getaway.

 

Liz brought with her a tape of Pam Ayres and chose Packing that extolled the virtues of packing for every eventuality and in doing so even managed to find a rhyme for Paracetamol.

 

An unexpected surprise was Mary Wilson’s gorgeous descriptions of the Scilly Isles; yes, you’re right, the wife of Harold Wilson and a fine poet in her own right. No stone or pebble left unturned.

 

Along with many more poets such as Jenny Joseph, William Blake and Lee Hunt we found out that W H Auden spent time in Rookhope and Bob managed to find a poem by Seamus Heaney despite Margaret not being able to recall his surname, the poet’s that is not Bob’s.

 

We finished the session with Marrazon Morning by Marilyn Lucy Worship from the National Poetry Anthology 2013 that portrayed the heat of a Spanish coastal town and screeching seagulls… actually that reminds me I must go and Google it.

 

Robert Reynolds